Resources

The resources in this area can be used independently or in groups to build financial capability knowledge and skills.
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Maths

Managing debt

Evaluate how good debt can contribute to your financial identity.

Read Managing Debt: Is credit the way to go? and evaluate payment plans for managing debt on a credit card. Analyse the differences between payment arrangements Jill can make to manage her debt.

 

Social Sciences

Sharing and reciprocity

Financial matters, community, and culture are interconnected.

Cultural practices and traditions shape people’s goals/whāinga paetae, ways of managing money/moni, expenses, and forms of income. Many cultural practices strengthen community and family ties, providing an important source of support for people facing financial or personal difficulties. Supporting members of family/whānau and the wider hapū, iwi, and other community groups is a way many people show care and gratitude.

Māori tikanga practices such as kotahitanga (unity) and whānaungatanga (kinship) help to build intergenerational wealth and emphasise collective thinking. Sharing of wealth is also evident in practices such as koha.

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Social Sciences

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Sharing and reciprocity

Financial matters, community, and culture are interconnected.

Cultural practices and traditions shape people’s goals/whāinga paetae, ways of managing money/moni, expenses, and forms of income. Many cultural practices strengthen community and family ties, providing an important source of support for people facing financial or personal difficulties. Supporting members of family/whānau and the wider hapū, iwi, and other community groups is a way many people show care and gratitude.

Māori tikanga practices such as kotahitanga (unity) and whānaungatanga (kinship) help to build intergenerational wealth and emphasise collective thinking. Sharing of wealth is also evident in practices such as koha.

View more

Social Sciences

Sharing and reciprocity

Financial matters, community, and culture are interconnected.

Cultural practices and traditions shape people’s goals/whāinga paetae, ways of managing money/moni, expenses, and forms of income. Many cultural practices strengthen community and family ties, providing an important source of support for people facing financial or personal difficulties. Supporting members of family/whānau and the wider hapū, iwi, and other community groups is a way many people show care and gratitude.

Māori tikanga practices such as kotahitanga (unity) and whānaungatanga (kinship) help to build intergenerational wealth and emphasise collective thinking. Sharing of wealth is also evident in practices such as koha.

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English

Spending before you earn?

Read Hire purchase – the true cost of hire purchase and record the information people should be aware of when using this payment option.

Describe what a debit card is and how it works.

List any recent online purchases you have made and explain why you chose to buy these items online.

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English

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Spending before you earn?

Explain how hire purchase works.

Find an ad offering hire purchase options, for example, for a washing machine or a set of furniture. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of using hire purchase to buy this product.

Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using a debit card instead of a credit card for purchases. Explain your reasoning.

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To give us detailed feedback about the content of the resources please email us at schools@sorted.org.nz 

 

Equipping young people for their financial future, embedding good money habits early on.

Hāpaitia te ara tika, pūmau ai te rangatiratanga mo ngā uri whakatipu.

English
Medium Education

Written in English with resources aligned to the New Zealand Curriculum.

Māori
Medium Education

Written in te reo Māori with resources aligned to Te Marautanga o Te Aho Matua and Te Marautanga o Aotearoa.

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